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a tale of two Lizos

We talk to loads of people on Twitter. There’s Kyle who seems to really like Grand Theft Auto, there’s Mark who turns into Wayne from Wayne’s World, there’s Heidi who once sent us a load of delicious brownies in a wooden box her boyfriend made, and there’s Not Lizo.

Not Lizo’s twitter account used to be @not_LizoMzimba helping to distinguish them from the ex-host of Newsround, Lizo Mzimba. So, to make sure we didn’t get the two of them confused, we referred to @not_LizoMzimba simply as ‘Not Lizo’. It was a good system. It worked. We didn’t mix them up once.

Not Lizo recently changed their Twitter name to ConfusedSpoons but we carried on calling them Not Lizo, just in case we forgot who they are (and who they aren’t). It’s a good job we did because the other day, when we were talking to Not Lizo, the real Lizo Mzimba somehow came across the conversation.

It’s just like Inception but instead of going into people’s dreams to steal something it’s more like us getting genuinely a bit starstruck by someone a lot of us grew up watching on TV.

Of course, the question now is who’s the real Lizo Mzimba? Is it the one with the verified Twitter account or was it Not Lizo all along? Is this whole conversation an elaborate set-up? If so, for what end? We’re onto you, Lizos. Whatever you’re planning, we’ll stop it.

 

fruit fishing in Costa Rica

A few weeks back, Mario and Easton from our Fruit Team travelled over to sunny Costa Rica in search of the best tasting bananas, oranges and pineapples to crush into our drinks.

 

First stop: bananas. Here they are growing upwards on the trees, casually defying gravity.

 

While a lot of plants are happy to sit about in the soil twiddling their thumbs all year, bananas are actually walking plants. In one banana plant there are three generations; the grandmother, who produces the first bunch of tasty bananas, the mother who gives the next bunch and several sons who grow at the bottom, next to the mother. The farmer will choose the son in the best location and the family will rotate every year. They end up walking about forty centimetres, which isn’t quite a marathon winning pace but is still pretty good for a plant.

Mario and Easton didn’t mess about when it came to their own walking either. One of the farms they visited was the size of 3000 football pitches, and contained 412,000 orange trees (we don’t think they managed to see them all).

And, if you thought that was impressive, another farm they stopped at was growing 46,800,000 pineapples at various stages of maturity. That's a lot of pineapples.

 

If you fancy getting your own pineapple population going, you can plant one in the garden by cutting off the crown, removing some of the lower leaves and popping it in the ground. The only downside is you’ll need warm and sunny conditions (good luck), and patience as they take about twelve months to grow.

So, unless you’ve got a spare pineapple sauna lying about and a bit of time to kill before next summer, it’s probably best to leave the growing to us.

saying hola to our strawberries

We use a lot of different fruits in our drinks. Pretty much all of them, actually (if you don’t count the weird ones you sometimes get with posh desserts). To make sure that we’re only ever putting the best tasting ingredients into our drinks, we go out and visit our farmers during the season of each fruit to make sure everything meets our standards and that the farm is ship shape from a technical, safety, quality and sustainability point of view. April means strawberry season in Spain so our Elodie and Lotte went over a couple of weeks back to pay a visit to our sunny Spanish farms.

 

While on their travels, they met with Pepe, one of our farmers. He has been working at the farm for more than thirty years and is really passionate about his work. Elodie and Lotte had the chance to try a few of his strawberries and can confirm that they were delicious (and would make a lovely pair of earrings). 

 

While the strawberries are in season, one plant will flower an average of eight times and it takes roughly twenty one days between the flower blossoming and picking an actual strawberry that we can use in our drinks. We don’t mind waiting around a bit for the perfect berry and we know they’re ready when they’ve grown large, orangey-red and sweet with a jammy flavour.

 

While we’re very picky about the taste of our berries, we aren’t picky about what they look like. We're happy to include all the weirdly shaped strawberries that the fresh market doesn’t want, which means there’s pretty much no waste.

Berry-illiant.

your post-bank holiday guide to what day of the week it is

It can be difficult coming back to work after a bank holiday. You've enjoyed your time away from your desk and, because you've lost a work day, it can be a busier week than you're used to. Not to mention the fact that years of working means you're so used to the first day back being a Monday. You're thrown off for the rest of the week, constantly checking your calendar to remind yourself what day it is.

So, to help you navigate this potential time trap, we’ve written a handy guide.

Yesterday was Monday but, as it was a bank holiday, it was really Sunday. Sunday was still Sunday. So was Saturday. That is, it wasn’t Sunday, it was still Saturday. Today is Monday but by Monday we mean Tuesday. Tomorrow, Wednesday, it’s Tuesday. Nobody quite knows what Thursday is. Friday will feel like Thursday but the best Thursday ever because it’s really Friday. Saturday is still Saturday.

Glad we could clear that up for you.

 

and the award goes to...

 

We don’t normally like to go on about all the awards we’ve won (except on this page dedicated to all the awards we’ve won) but we’re really proud to say that the innocent foundation has just picked up a Better Society award for their work with Action Against Hunger

Together they’ve launched a ground-breaking project that aims to stop children dying from severe hunger all around the world by transforming access to treatment services. By empowering community health workers to diagnose and treat children at home, rather than expecting their parents to walk up to 40km to the nearest clinic every week for treatment, they can tackle undernutrition head on.

If you’d like to find out a bit more about all the awesome stuff they've achieved so far, you can have a read here.