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Thoughts from category: art

imagine having a cloud in your front room

You could spend your days lying on the rug in front of the fire, dipping crudités into houmous while you marvel at the magic of water and its various states and dream of a life less ordinary.

The Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde must have had a similar idea, as he's found a way to conjure up indoor clouds using a smoke machine, moisture and dramatic lighting. Pretty impressive eh?

Nimbus ii by berndnaut smilde Nimbus by berndnaut smilde

The only problem is that the clouds only last a split second before disappearing, which means that our dreams of cosy carpet picnics are a little way off from becoming reality.

a new bench

We like fruit and we like sitting down, so really it was only a matter of time before we got ourselves a bench modelled on a banana.

It wasn't something we could create ourselves though, so luckily help came in the form of builder and wood carver extraordinaire Neil Melville Rae.

The banana is one of a number of fruit sculptures that Neil's been working on which were submitted to last year's Arundel Gallery Trail as an exhibition called "The Temple of the Strange Fruit".

The Source

The wood used for the sculptures came from a 200 year old oak tree which was sourced locally to Neil in West Sussex. The tree had been dead for some time and was in a dangerous condition, so it was carefully felled and put to good use.

The Model

Here's the model for the banana sculpture.

Work in Progress 1

And here it is being made.

Bananabench

It took a few strapping men to carry it in.

Bananabench1

And now it sits pride of place in the chill out.

this and that - a week in the life of the creative team

This week has been big. We've heard about a chimp in a hot tub, met a celebrity, experienced a natural phenomenon, been wooed and had a lookalike revelation.

1st up: Dan got Tansy some flowers for her birthday, but, worried this would cause anarchy and jealous rifts in the team, placated us with a rose each. Although a week in creative corner in a latte cup has taken its toll.

Rose

Next up a celebrity talking "extra naked". At the 1st Brains for Breakfast Louis Theroux enilightened us with Nietzsche quotes, shocked us with poo-throwing stories, spiced our day up with Chippendale based philosophies and wowed us with a pretty marvelous talk. (All before 10am)

Louis

3rd: Dan undid his diet. He ate all this pizza. Alone. No one else had any. At all. Not even one slice. Well except these two, who got in there quick.

Pizza

All we got was this tiny mushroom. Which we had to share. Kinda undid all that flower buying.

Mini mush

Just one more thing before we go...

Designers Seb and Lewis?

Hobbits

Or is it Frodo and Samwise?

Lotr

Over and out. Have a great weekend one and all.

a little something in the post

Emails are great. They're super fast, no trees are harmed in their making and they merrily congregate in your inbox while you're on holiday, cheerfully greeting you on your first day back in a way that makes you instantly forget you've been away.

But as much as we appreciate the merits of emails, we also think that the pleasure of getting a little something in the post takes some beating. Which is why this project really caught our eye. It's called Snail Mail My Email, and it's a month long art project seeking to bring back appreciation for the art of letter writing by letting participants submit emails which are handwritten on paper, tucked into an envelope, and posted to a recipient of your choice.

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So if you want to let a special someone know what they mean to you, that you like their new hairdo or that you're sorry for borrowing their top 10 years ago, staining it with tomato ketchup and hiding it back in their wardrobe, then all you have to do is drop them an email message of no more than 100 words and make sure you remember to include the address you want it to go to. Be quick though, the project ends on August 15th.

And if you're a bit handy with a felt tip pen and have five minutes to spare, you could of course just do it yourself.