Menu

Thoughts from March 2016

the innocent sow & grow - growing update

Last week we sent out growing kits to over 3,000 schools across the country with the aim of helping over 100,000 school kids to discover the fun of growing their own veg. Pots, soil and seeds, everything you need (except from water, which seemed like a bit much to send through the post). A week or so in, we thought we’d check in to see how their growing is going.

Flamstead End Primary school above is going strong with some already impressive shoots of, we think, spinach. It could be peas. They’re fairly similar in the very early stages. Think of it like a cliffhanger, Jack Bauer himself couldn’t cope with this suspense.

And Shorne Church of England Primary School clearly have some sort of powers when it comes to cress growing. Probably not that useful a super power though. It probably wouldn’t get you into the X-Men. But when you need a garnish for an egg sandwich, you’ll be laughing.

There’s still plenty of ways to get involved with sow & grow. Head to the sow & grow website to find growing guides, activities and all the updates from the thousands of schools taking part.

get your trowels out

The grey days are a bit less grey and the hot water bottle isn't seeing as much action as it used to. It can only mean one thing: winter is on the way out and spring is in. 

This week we've been braving the spidery corner of the shed and unearthing our spade and fork set so we can start messing about in the garden. That's how we came across this handy infographic from Wayfair, which is a guide to growing your own superfoods:

Grow Your Own Superfoods

There's no excuse not to pack in the globe artichoke and goji berries now. In fact, we might put a word in with the ladies in our products kitchen and see if we can borrow their blender. The next big smoothie recipe, we reckon.

the innocent sow & grow

We’ve teamed up with Grow it Yourself and iChild for the innocent Sow & Grow. We want to encourage kids to grow their own veg to help them better understand where their food comes from.

By growing it themselves, kids are much more likely to enjoy eating fruit & veg and continue eating healthily as they grow older (while playing about in the mud and getting their hands a bit grubby). This year, Sow & Grow will help 100,000 children in thousands of schools across the UK and Ireland to have their first food-growing experience in the classroom.

We’ve sent out pots, seeds and soil to 3,300 schools across the country. We’ll be checking in over the next or month or so to see how their growing is going.

All our school places have been taken but there’s still loads of ways to get your own kids involved. Head to our sow & grow site to find out how.