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Thoughts from August 2016

jaffa cake or jaffa biscuit?

Recently, during the return of Bake Off, we asked our Twitter followers an important question.

Are Jaffa Cakes a cake or a biscuit?

 

 

We’d even go as far as saying it’s possibly the most important question of modern times. Yes, people argue about religion or politics or the correct way to eat Maltesers*, but you only really know the full measure of a person once you’ve had the Jaffa Cake Conversation (or JCC for the busy amongst us).

Immediately, people on Twitter started to bring up the fact that this entire question was apparently solved in a court case a few years ago. Cakes, you see, are charged a different VAT rate so the matter had to be settled legally. It turns out that one of the primary differences between cakes and biscuits is that cakes go hard when stale while biscuits go soft. And, seeing as Jaffa Cakes undoubtedly toughen up after a period during which they miraculously go uneaten, it was decided that they were cakes.

But maybe that’s just what they want us to think? Maybe there’s something else going on? Maybe, deep in some underground bunker miles beneath London, there’s some secret consortium of cake bakers locked in a battle against a cult of biscuit artists that goes back for thousands of years? Maybe, just maybe, Jaffa Cakes are some sort of mythical object and whichever side ‘owns’ them can dictate the shape of reality itself? Maybe we’re all pawns in an ancient game that none of us can truly understand?

Or maybe everyone involved could realise that they’re called Jaffa Cakes. Clue’s in the name.


*bite all the chocolate off, eat the malty goodness after

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Kiwis. What came first – the bird or the fruit?

We travel far and wide to source the finest fruit for our drinks, which can take us to sunny places, rainy places, and, occasionally, downright explosive places. We stay as close to the fruit as we can to make sure it’s as tasty and responsibly sourced as possible, and our kiwis, odd-looking and slightly hairy as they may be, are no exception.

 

We make a purée from our kiwis to use in drinks like these. Because we don’t want to waste any kiwi, we actually use the whole fruit, from the seeds to the fuzzy coating. Nobody wants a fuzzy purée, so, to avoid this, we carefully wash the fruit and then sieve it several times which ensures that the purée tastes as delicious and hairless as a purée made from bald kiwis would be.

It’s important not to be ‘that guy’ who only bangs on about fruit, so we ask other important questions to our growers in New Zealand. Like whether the bird was named after the fruit or the fruit after the bird. We’re chuffed to confirm that (drumroll) it was in fact the fruit that was named after the bird. Ages ago, somewhere in New Zealand, someone decided to name the local birds ‘kiwis’. Then, the word ‘kiwi’ was applied as a nickname to things from New Zealand, the world largest producer of kiwi. One day, the Chinese gooseberry was renamed as ‘kiwi fruit’ for marketing purposes in New Zealand. The rest is history.

So that’s one of the big questions answered. Use it (in pub quizzes) wisely.

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this film is bananas

Whether you love them or hate them, bananas are the unsung heroes of the smoothie-making game. We've been adding bananas into our smoothies since 1999, and we get through absolutely loads of them every year. To protect the farmers and the local environment where they're grown, we only use bananas from Rainforest Alliance Certified farms. We've made a short video about why we think it's really important for the planet, and you can watch it right here:

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