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pigeons

At lunchtime, on the way to the supermarket, having walked the ‘secret’ route under the bridge and along the canal, we spotted these pigeons. Loads of them. This picture doesn’t do it justice. They were everywhere

We can’t help but wonder what they were queuing for. Were they waiting for their own lunch? Or concert tickets? Were they queuing for a famous pigeon celebrity who was doing a book signing?

We’ll probably never know but, just in case, we’ll keep an eye on them.

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a bonfire night reminder

It makes complete sense to celebrate the thwarting of the Gunpowder Plot by gathering outside in the freezing cold, watching bright explosions in the sky and setting fire to a big pile of leaves. We’re fairly sure that this is exactly what Guy Fawkes had in mind as he guarded the gunpowder filled basements of Parliament.

One of the dangers of Bonfire Night is that hedgehogs really, really like big piles of leaves. They often crawl into bonfires well before they’re lit, only to find themselves in trouble when the night comes.

So before lighting yours, lift the whole bonfire up with a broom handle and shine a torch underneath. The hedgehogs will be startled and rush back to the hedges where they belong. And you can spend a lovely guilt-free evening with your family letting off worryingly large fireworks in your back garden without any health and safety training.

And if you want to know more about how to save hedgehogs, The British Hedgehog Preservation Society have loads more ways to get involved.

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smoots

We were reading about smoots the other day, a unit of measurement based on the height of Oliver Smoot in 1964 (5 feet 7 inches). As a prank when he was a student at MIT, Oliver Smoot repeatedly lay down on the Harvard Bridge while his friends measured how many of him would make up its length. It was discovered that the bridge was 364.4 smoots. 

Since then the smoot has become a semi-official measurement of distance. The original marks are repainted every year and you can even use it in the official Google Calculator (we’ve worked out that Fruit Towers is just over 14 smoots).

Having learnt about smoots, we then got lost in a tunnel of other odd (and surprisingly real) ways to measure stuff.

The beard-second - 10 nanometers, the distance the average beard grows in a second.

The sheppey - the closest distance at which sheep remain picturesque

The New York second - the time between the lights turning green and the cab behind you beeping its horn. The shortest imaginable measurement of time there is.

A Warhol - a measurement of fame. Fifteen minutes worth of fame equals 1 Warhol. Can be expanded to:

- 1 kilowarhol — famous for 15,000 minutes (about ten days)

- 1 megawarhol — famous for 15 million minutes, (roughly 28.5 years)

We’d like to add our own method of measurement to all this. 

The Wiki-moment - The amount of time you accidentally spend on Wikipedia before realising you really should get back to work.

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meet the knitters: marion

There are two sure-fire ways to get our attention. 

1 - Send us a picture that somehow includes a good dog

2 - Send us a picture of loads of Big Knit hats that you’ve knitted

Marion knows us well. Not only does she have a good dog (hello Dusty, who’s a good boy?) but she’s also one of our most prolific Big Knit knitters. Last year we featured her and her friend Ali on our bottles for knitting 2,500 hats, this year Marion’s already on her way to another 2,000.

Thanks, Marion. You’re the best.

If you want to help out with this year’s Big Knit, you can. Just head to our Big Knit website where you’ll find knitting patterns, how-to guides and everything else you’ll need to get involved. Thanks in advance, couldn’t do it without you.

Or if you know someone like Marion and want us to know about them too, please do tell us. We’re constantly in awe of our knitters and want to know as many of them as we can. Drop an email about them to hello@innocentdrinks.co.uk and we’ll do our best to give them a proper thank you.

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nominative determinism

Recently we’ve become interested in the idea of nominative determinism, the theory that people are naturally drawn to careers that match their names. For example, if you were called Ian Growsuptobealawyer then you’d have an increased chance of growing up to become a lawyer. We’d also love to hear from you, Ian. You have an amazing name.

Other examples of nominative determinism include:

Mark de Man - Belgian footballer (a defensive midfielder, no less)

Usain Bolt - very fast man from those internet adverts

Storm Field - American meteorologist

Sue Yoo - lawyer who we promise we didn’t just make up

Sara Blizzard - BBC weatherperson

James Peach - actual person who works in Fruit Towers

Did your name subliminally send you down your career path? Or are you Ian Growsuptobealawyer? Get in touch if so (especially the latter).

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