Menu

Daily Thoughts

congratulations to our sow & grow winners

Recently we finished up the innocent Sow & Grow. Our campaign to help get kids growing their own veg and learn more about where food comes from. We sent seeds and growing kits to 100,000 kids in over 3,000 schools to help them develop healthy habits that could last for life.

Of course, being British, we couldn’t exactly have lots of people growing stuff without turning it into some sort of competition. Gardening competitions are an important part of life and who are we to break with tradition? So we got our fancy pens and clipboards out, read through all the school’s growing diaries and looked for the veg that impressed us the most.

After much searching we chose Horsenden Primary School. Their cress was incredible, their peas were perfect, their spinach was good enough for Popeye. We packed up the grassy van with their prizes and headed over.

It turned out that Horsenden used to have a vegetable patch but ran out of money to keep it going. Now, thanks to their winning the innocent Sow & Grow, they’ve got gardening tools, a brand new wheelbarrow and loads of seeds to help them get it started up again.

“Taking part in Sow and Grow has been, without a doubt, the highlight of the academic year for my class.,” said Miss Wright, a teacher at the school. “It is rare to find a project that can engage a whole class and draw enthusiasm from even the most reluctant of learners, but the Sow and Grow initiative certainly achieved that. From planting the seeds to harvesting our small crops, every child was excited to get their hands dirty and learn as much as they could about growing their own food.”

And, just this morning, they sent us one of the best thank you cards we’ve ever received. A story about the ‘smart smoothie summery tree’, hand drawn pictures of all the kids and, to top it all off, a proper pop-up made entirely of fruits. It’s already done the rounds in Fruit Towers to a chorus of ‘ooh’ and ‘ahh’.

A huge thanks to everyone who took part this year and congratulations again to Horsenden Primary School. You’re the best (at growing stuff).

There are no comments about this post Why not be the first?

we'd like to thank the academy

A couple of weeks back we told you we’d been nominated for a Guardian Sustainable Business Award for a project to reduce the amount of water used to grow our strawberries. This little film explains what the project was about:

We had our gracious loser face down to a fine art by the time we made our way to the ceremony, but, to our complete shock, we actually went and won the thing. No award is complete without an acceptance speech, so we’ve asked Jess, who leads our sustainability team, to say a few words:

“We are beyond thrilled to have won this award. We have been working with our Spanish farmers and the University of Cordoba for six and a half years to reduce the amount of water used in strawberry growing and, in doing so, protect the wetlands of the Doñana National Park. Our little project has grown from working with just four farmers, to now influencing the water management of 87% of all the strawberry farms (even though we only buy 1% of the strawberries grown on them.)  It proves that even if your idea starts small, if you find the right solution, and get everyone involved, you can make a big difference.  We are now sharing what we’ve learned with our berry farmers in Poland, and will see if we can use it with other fruits in the future too.”

The award itself is pretty special, and has taken pride of place on our Reception desk here in Fruit Towers:

 

As a business we’ve always wanted to leave things a bit better than we found them, so we’re really proud to be recognised for making a difference. We know there’s loads more we could do though, and we still have a long way to go before everything we do is award-worthy. We’ve got lots of exciting plans to get even greener in the next few years, so watch this space.

Now if you’ll excuse us, we’re off to the after party.

There are 3 comments about this post Why not add your own?

the boys are waiting

We’re ambitious. We have dreams. If it was up to us, every fridge across the land would be stuffed full of smoothies. But for some reason, people occasionally choose other drinks over the delicious, healthy, unquestionably brilliant and always humble smoothie. For instance, people in Scotland really like an Irn Bru. In the North of England, it’s against the law for a scone to be consumed without a cup of tea. Residents of East London will happily pay £4.50 for an artisanal flat white served in a miniature upcycled wheelbarrow. And whenever people want to encourage the boys to gather in their yard, they reach for a milkshake because Kelis made it clear in her 2003 hit song of the same name that that was the right thing to do.

However, this piece of breaking news from the Irish Daily Star might make you question your future beverage purchasing preferences:

That’s right: Kelis has never had a milkshake. But she did have a smoothie the other day and it was “really good.”

So, there you have it. Smoothies, not milkshakes, are now considered the official yard-bringing beverage of choice.

If you’re not sure how to make a smoothie, we could teach you, but we’d have to charge.  

There are 5 comments about this post Why not add your own?

slightly more than nul points

Nothing says ‘summer is coming’ like staying indoors on a Saturday night in May to watch a contest that the UK hasn’t even the slightest hope of winning. Sure, the rest of Europe stopped backing our Eurovision entries decades ago, but this year would be different, wouldn’t it? We brewed the first of several dozen cups of tea and sat down to watch it unfold.

Before we start, you need to know that Australia were back in the competition for the second time. Don’t worry if that doesn’t immediately make sense to you. It’s all perfectly reasonable really.

 

Belgium were up first with a copy of a recent, world-famous fusion of pop and funk music.

 

Germany’s performance stood by the old saying, “If what you’re singing isn’t very good, just wear a hat made exclusively out of tiny bow ties.”

 

Then again, sometimes Eurovision outfits just don’t work and half of what you’re wearing has to go go.

 

Poland’s style inspiration came from a popular West End musical with a continental flare.

 

At this point, we remembered that we make smoothies and we should try to sell them.

 

During the half-time break, the organisers pulled out all the stops with a cameo from none other than Justin Timberlake, who made it clear that he was a true fan of the Eurovision Song Contest and was in absolutely no way motivated by anything else when he agreed to do this.

Finally, with all of that singing lark well and truly over it was time for the results of the voting.

Iceland used a dog to help them announce their results for some reason.

 

Malta gave us 12 points and we realised that we’ve always loved the Maltese with their falcons, addictive chocolate sweets and all of that other great Maltese stuff.

Then Australia gave their scores

 

Everybody was confused by the new voting system.

 

But in the end, despite Malta’s best efforts, Joe and Jake didn’t get much of a look in. But the important thing is that we reminded everyone to buy smoothies, and have probably kept our jobs for another year. 

 

 

There are 2 comments about this post Why not add your own?